Redwood Videos

Harvesting Redwood Responsibly

Transcript:

Harvesting Redwood Responsibly

Mike Jani, President & Chief Forester

“Harvesting timber today is much, much different than it was back at the turn of the century. It was not atypical for these big old-growth redwood trees to be laid out and then using either oxens or later bulldozers had them skid right down the drainages to the bottoms of the hills to where the mills were generally located. Today, it is much, much different. We think about every move that we make in the woods when we’re lying out and engineering our harvesting.

“The way we practice selective harvesting we try and thin fairly evenly through the various diameter classes and age classes in the stand. The nice thing about selective harvesting is when you go and make an entry in the forest and once you’re finished you still have a standing forest. In Redwood, we actually think we’re going to develop better wood qualities from logs that are grown using a kind of selection management. Because they won’t grow as fast, the growth rings will be a little bit tighter because of that but the quality of wood that’s derived from those logs should be better.

“In the case of both of our forest, when we purchased the lands they had a history of over harvesting so we decidedly made a move to cut much less that we were growing so we could restore the inventories back on these forest lands. Now, there’ll be some point at which a balance is achieved where we’re harvesting and growing somewhere close to the same. We’ll probably always grow a little bit more than we harvest. Everyday that we come back to the forest, we’ve grown more wood on the forest than we’ve actually harvested. So our forests are going to mature, and get older and grow bigger trees over time.”

Stream Restoration in Redwood Forestlands

Transcript:

Stream Restoration in Redwood Forestlands

Mike Jani, President & Chief Forester

“Over the years there have been various types of roads built across all these properties. Many of them using undersized culverts that were put in 50 years ago. Because they’re metal the bottoms are rusty now. And so we’re very systematically going through the properties, inventorying which are our oldest pipes, and which pipes if they fail have in potential to deliver sediment into streams. And we prioritize, and go back in dig out old pipes if it’s appropriate, put in a new properly sized culvert and in cases where the drainage really is too big too accommodate a culvert, we’ll remove both the culvert and the dirt that is covering the culvert and put in bridges.”

Sarah Billig, Stewardship Director

“So what is going to happen here is we’re actually going to take out this culvert. What we’re going to do clean out all this dirt in between this side of the creek and the other side of the creek.
Then we’re clean all that out, put it in a safe place where it won’t go anywhere, and we’re going to build a bridge across this creek and the creek will go at a grade where the salmon can actually make it up to the other side. Our assessment has shown that there is about 1000 feet of creek further up that the salmon could use to spawn, that can now be opened up by putting that bridge into place.”

Managing Redwood Forests Responsibly

Transcript:

Managing Redwood Forests Responsibly

Mike Jani, President & Chief Forester

“This is a really neat example on our forest of what we mean when we say we’re managing uneven aged forests.

“Right around us you can see very, very old trees. And as you look around, you’ll see different age groups that for one reason or another likely had a lot to do with periodic fires that were a natural part of this environment came in and created different age classes of trees in here.

“So, you’ve got real old trees and then some that are probably a couple hundred years old and then trees in here that are 40, 60 and 80 years old. So this is a really, really good example of how our management over time will look when we get the point where we’ve harvested in stands multiple times. There is a lot of diversity in this stand, there is old, dominant mature hardwoods and dominant Douglas-fir trees, young trees that have plenty of sunlight, basically, what we call “free to grow” coming in underneath the dominant trees.

“We may not enter this site again for another 30 years, but in time we’ll take a few large trees and then the small trees.

“This is kind of just in a good balance.

“These coastal redwoods sprout from the stump, so we selectively plant where we don’t currently have redwoods growing we’ll look for opportunities to actually go out and plant new trees. But in most cases, we get regeneration from stump sprouting.”

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P.O. Box 565
Scotia, CA 95565

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